How to write a child protection policy

Will the new policy discourage people from volunteering or becoming more involved? Use whatever means is available to you to get the word out. The purpose of the policy: Sample Policy Statement We recognise that: In our work and contact with children we all have a responsibility to keep them safe from harm.

Common features might include: Links to relevant guidance Briefly state the main law and guidance that supports the policy.

Ignorance is a top reason abusers get away with what they do. Sexual predators are not anything like us — Why would they target our church? Equality statement Your organisation should make sure that all children and young people have the same protection regardless of age, disability, gender reassignment, race, religion or belief, sex, or sexual orientation.

When writing your procedures, use the sections below as headings and then write your own responses underneath them.

Writing a safeguarding policy

Explain who should tell whom, and what action to take including contact numbers, for example Local Authority Designated Officer ; How to respond to a child telling you about abuse: You might also want to check online for some sample policies.

It should be made known to all children, young people and adults and, where possible, it should be prominently displayed, perhaps on a poster.

The goal in this step is to build consensus. It should cover all children under 18 but does it apply to all adults in the organisation? Explain how this policy links to other relevant organisational policies and procedures such as taking photographs and videos, internet use, recruitment.

What about those who have occasional contact with children such as a caretaker? In many instances, straightforward measures can readily control risks, for example ensuring spillages are cleaned up promptly so people do not slip, or cupboard drawers are kept closed to ensure people do not trip.

The procedures must include: So only people who need to know should be told about it. It is very important to have clear instructions to ensure that there is a speedy and effective response for dealing with concerns about a child or young person.

We shared that all CPPs are unique and will look different for each organization. Writing or rewriting your policies is a large task. This keeps the need for prevention fresh in their minds and helps them to know they did the right thing by approving the CPP. It should be clear who staff, parents and children should talk to if they are worried.

Just remember your CPP will be unique to your situation, goals and objectives. Your policy needs to state your commitment to anti-discriminatory practice and should explicitly recognise the additional needs of children from minority ethnic groups and disabled children and the barriers they may face, especially around communication.

This guidance derives from the NSPCC Safeguarding Tool and will assist you to formulate a child protection policy for your organisation. Services and groups are responsible for ensuring that their staff and volunteers understand their safeguarding responsibilities and are skilled and confident.

Please note…these final steps often pose the most challenge, and you may encounter some resistance. What legalities need to be considered? Last week, in Part 2we looked at the process of planning and creating your own personalized CPP. This includes staff, volunteers, parents and the children themselves.

Making sure your organisation has safeguards in place: Scope of the policy Be clear about who the policy applies to.A "child protection" or "safeguarding" policy is a statement that makes it clear to staff, parents and children what the organisation or group thinks about safeguarding, and what it will do to keep children safe.

Child protection policy Children International’s Child Protection Policy is made up of several components, all with the goal of keeping children and youth safe. This guidance derives from the NSPCC Safeguarding Tool and will assist you to formulate a child protection policy for your organisation.

When writing your procedures, use the sections below as headings and then write your own responses underneath them. The procedures must include.

7 Guidance for Writing Child Protection Policy and Procedures

Welcome to the third and final post in our “Child Safety” series on the purpose, planning, writing and implementing of a Child Protection Policy (CPP). Last week, in Part 2, we looked at the process of planning and creating your own personalized killarney10mile.com shared that all CPPs are unique and will look different for each organization.

A safeguarding or child protection policy is a statement that makes it clear what an organisation or group will do to keep children safe. It should include: a statement setting out the organisation's commitment to protecting all children. Before writing a child protection policy, consider who the right person might be to write this policy, and what support or consultation will be required to .

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How to write a child protection policy
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